Hopsewee Plantation 

History and heritage

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Hopsewee Plantation, part of the South Carolina National Heritage Corridor, is one of the oldest historic preservations open to the public in the United States.  Hopsewee has been preserved since its construction between 1735 and 1740.  Only five families have owned the plantation since it was built, and Hopsewee has remained essentially the same for almost three centuries.  The plantation remains open to the public because of the desire of its owners, who live in the house, to share its rich legacy.

First lived in by Thomas Lynch, Sr., an early leader in the American Revolution, both he and his son, Thomas Lynch Jr., were South Carolina delegates to the Second Continental Congress.  Thomas Lynch, Jr. signed the Declaration of Independence, making Hopsewee Plantation the only remaining birthplace of a South Carolina signer of the Declaration of Independence. 

The original house is a classic 18th century Colonial plantation house with its porches overlooking the North Santee River and the rice fields beyond.  Built of black cypress, the home features hand-carved molding and random-width heart pine floors.  Eighteenth and nineteenth century furnishings complement each room.

Two original slave cabins and a smokehouse remain with the original plantation house.  These slave cabins were used as living quarters by Hopsewee slaves and their descendants until the late 1940s.

A nature lover’s delight, the Plantation is surrounded by 100 acres, permanently protected from development.  The grounds are graced with ancient moss-hung live oaks, beneath which are a majestic array of camellias and azaleas.  A terraced dock nestled under the stately branches of a spectacular live oak provides a beautiful view of the Santee River.

The River Oak Tearoom at Hopsewee, recommended by Southeast US Travel Guide, is one of eight recommended dining experiences from Wilmington to Charleston.  Its dining offers great Lowcountry favorites or a wonderful Southern Tea. Diners enjoy the rich heritage of the grounds, while savoring the tastes that make Hopsewee timeless. 

Gullah Geechee Presentation

Hopsewee Plantation proudly introduces tours focusing on the enslaved African experiences on this historic plantation. Come join us as we begin to expand the narrative to include their contributions to the wealth and influence of colonial South Carolina and how their knowledge, ingenuity, and labor helped to build this nation. Here at Hopsewee, you’ll have the opportunity to learn about the Gullah Geechee people and the special significance of their Creolized culture and language.

According to the Census of 1850, there were 178 enslaved Africans on Hopsewee land. There were approximately 30 cabins inhabited by the enslaved population. They lived there, cooking their meals over open fires and sleeping up to 14 per cabin. In the evenings after their work was done, they would gather around campfires, sharing stories with one another and developing their own Creolized language and music culture.

The row of cabins at Hopsewee Plantation occupied by the enslaved Africans were situated on a parcel of land that came to be known as Slave Street. Although some cabins continued to be occupied until as late as 1947, all of the cabins, except for two, fell into a state of disrepair and were ultimately torn down.

The enslaved Africans kept the plantation running, working the rice and indigo fields, preparing the meals for the plantation home and each other, maintaining the property, and taking care of livestock and all tools and equipment. Rice production was extremely labor intensive. Rice was the second major crop at Hopsewee. Indigo was the first cash crop for the plantation, the dye from which was used to color the uniforms of English soldiers.

Of the approximately 30 slave cabins that once adorned the grounds at Hopsewee, only two remain. 

Glander grew up in the Gullah Community speaking the language and has a desire to share the history of her ancestors who came from the plantations in the Georgetown area. Raised in the Gullah culture of Georgetown, South Carolina, Zenobia Harper is an artist and storyteller with a desire to share with visitors to Hopsewee the story of the enslaved Africans that shaped the many rice and indigo plantations along the Carolina coast, and how their descendants, the Gullah people, continue to preserve their legacy.

For more information, contact
Augusta Couch or Raejean Beattie
(843) 546-7891         mail@hopsewee.com            www.hopsewee.com



Tours and Dining
(pricing for groups over 20 people)

Tour and Southern Tea ………………………………………….. $54 per person

Southern Tea only …………………………………………………………….. $30 per person

Tour and Soup and Choice of Sandwich …………………. $52 per person

Tour and Luncheon Menu – Salad Plate …………………… $52 per person

Tour and Lowcountry Sampler Lunch Plate…………….. $54 per person

Tour and Choice of Four Luncheon Menu ……………….. $54 per person

Wine by the River Happy Hour Tour ………………………. $64 per person

Box Lunch (tour priced separately) …………………………. $20 per person

Tour and Dinner …………………………………………………… $93 per person

Cash Wine and Beer bar available upon request 

All pricing includes tax and gratuity unless otherwise stated in description.

Driver and Escort Complimentary for groups over 40.  The River Oak Tea Room can seat up to 80 people. 

Larger groups can be accommodated on the grounds, with additional charges. 

Please inform us of any dietary restrictions such as
allergies, gluten intolerance or vegetarian preferences prior to your tour.

Luncheon Menu

Southern Tea

Our most popular menu for groups.  Our Southern Tea is modeled after an English Afternoon Tea served in three courses. After your tour, return to the River Oak Cottage Tearoom where the tables are set with vintage linens, fine china and silver. Several varieties of tea are chosen for your group as they enjoy savories, scones and sweets.
An unforgettable experience that is often served as a light lunch. 

Cucumber Sandwiches, Curried Chicken Salad on Ginger Snaps, Salmon Mousse , Blue Cheese Spinach Quiche, House made Parmesan Crackers with Mozzarella, Pesto and Tomatoes

Freshly Baked Scones served with Lemon Curd, Cottage Cream and our Tea Infused Jelly

A selection of Hopsewee sweets:
Flourless Chocolate Cake, Lemon Chess Pie, White Chocolate Cheesecake
Served with a variety of Hot Tea

Soup and Sandwich Plate

A lighter lunch with a choice of soup, sandwich or salad. Place your orders prior to the tour so your meal will be ready when you return to the River Oak Cottage Tearoom where the tables are set with vintage linens, fine china and sterling silver. This meal can also be served al fresco as a soup and sandwich bar. 

Choice of Creamy Tomato Basil or Gin-Gin Soup (Chicken Wild Rice and Mushroom)
Choice of Chicken Salad, Tuna Salad, Egg Salad or BBQ
on Wheat Bread or Bed of Lettuce and Fresh Fruit

Hopsewee Pound Cake

Iced Tea, Mint Lemonade or Soft Drink

Lowcountry Sampler Lunch Plate

A heartier meal with Lowcountry favorites.  Another standard on our regular lunch menu, groups enjoy this taste of the South.  After your tour return to the River Oak Cottage Tearoom.
 

House made pulled pork with Mustard based BBQ Sauce
Pirleau – A Southern chicken and rice recipe, made with rice, vegetables, chicken and sausage
Collard Greens with smoked meat and rutabagas
Macaroni and Cheese
Sweet Potato Casserole
Pimento Cheese Biscuits      

Hopsewee Pound Cake

Iced Tea, Mint Lemonade or Soft Drink


BOX LUNCH 

A picnic lunch to be enjoyed outside under the Oaks. Perfect for school groups or those looking for a quick meal before heading out for their next adventure  

Chicken Salad Sandwich or BBQ Sandwich

Served with Potato Salad, Fresh Fruit and
Chef’s Choice Dessert

Iced Tea, Mint Lemonade or Soft Drink

Chicken Salad Platter

This cold salad plate is a delicious standard on our regular menu and is always well received by our groups.  After your tour return to the River Oak Cottage Tearoom where the tables are set with vintage linens, fine china and sterling silver.

Honey Dijon Chicken Salad over Mixed Greens Served with a Trio of Potato, Pasta and Bean Salad and Fresh Fruit
Pimento Cheese Biscuits

Hopsewee Pound Cake served with lemon curd, Cottage cream and fresh berries

Iced Tea, Mint Lemonade or Soft Drink

Choice of Four Luncheon Menu 

If your group has a wide variety of food preferences, guests can choose from four options.  Each guest receives a sticker with their choice before they begin the tour and when they return to the Tearoom, the plated meals are provided in a timely fashion so your group can enjoy their meal with minimal wait times.  

Shrimp and Grits with House Salad

Blue Cheese Spinach Quiche with House Salad

Chicken Salad Platter with Potato Salad, Pasta Salad and Bean Salad    

Lowcountry Sampler (Pulled Pork, Pirleau, Collard Greens, Mac & Cheese, Sweet Potato Casserole

All meals served with Pimento Cheese Biscuits, Chef’s Choice of Dessert, Choice of Iced Tea, Minted Lemonade, or Soft Drink

TOUR AND DINNER

For a very special evening, enjoy an afternoon tour followed by an extraordinary dinner in the tearoom. Start with drinks and light hors d’ouerves, followed by a three course dinner with salad, entrée and dessert. Wine and beer, tea, coffee and soft drinks. 

Cocktail hour with Wine and Beer and light hors d’oeurves, Setups for BYO liquor

Choice of Salad or Soup

Choice of 3 sides     Choice of 2 entrees

Choice of 2 desserts

Iced Tea, Soft Drinks and Coffee Service

Wine by the River Happy Hour Tour 

Enjoy an afternoon tour followed by Wine, Beer, Soft Drinks and some of our favorite appetizers. A nice way to finish up the day as you head back to your hotel.

Several selections of red and white House wines

Domestic and imported beer

Iced Tea, Minted Lemonade and Soft Drinks

Cheese and Crackers, Fruit and Chef’s choice
 of appetizers from our new
“Hopsewee Cooking” cookbook

#1 of 55 Things to Do
in Georgetown

According to TripAdvisor Travelers
as of January 2022

Myrtle Beach to Hopsewee Plantation

10 a.m.          The Rice Museum – 633 Front Street, Georgetown – 843-546-7423

The rice museum is perhaps the best first stop in Georgetown County to help give visitors a basis of the region’s history and heritage, much of which was influenced by the labor of enslaved West Africans. By 1840, the Georgetown District produced nearly one-half of the total rice crop in the United States. Tours available with fee.

                       Time at site 1.25 hours

11:15 a.m.    Our Step-on guide will show you historic homes, churches, and cemeteries – some predating the Revolutionary War.  The streets, lined with majestic oak trees, added to the romance and mystery of what is now Georgetown’s Historic District all shared with you through the eyes of someone who grew up amidst such beauty and history, never taking for granted the paradise that is Georgetown.

12:00            Tour of Hopsewee Plantation Attic to Cellar guided tour of Original Rice Plantation House, built between 1735 and 1740 and birthplace of Signer of the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Lynch, Jr.  This Rice Plantation was successful due to the hundreds of enslaved Africans and their descendants who built over 400 acres of rice fields and cultivated rice for over 125 years.

Our Gullah Historian shares rich history of enslaved Africans and their descendants as you stroll through the beautiful grounds and riverfront.

1:00 p.m.      Lunch at Hopsewee Plantation – On-site dining with a variety of menu options with seating for up to 80 guests in the Tearoom

                       Time at site 2.5  hours

2:30 p.m.      Leave Hopsewee for shopping in Georgetown and/or at the Hammock Shops in Pawleys Island on your way back to Myrtle Beach
 

Or maybe you are heading down to Charleston for the next part of your adventure. 
Travel time to either Myrtle Beach or Charleston is about one hour

Suggested Itineraries

Myrtle Beach to Hopsewee and Night of 1000 Candles

Available Thursday, Friday and Saturday
First 3 Weeks in December 

9:30 am.        Depart Myrtle Beach for Georgetown – From 21st Street (Broadway at the Beach) it is about 1 hour and 5 minutes to Hopsewee Plantation

10:40 am      As you cross over the bridge out of Georgetown, watch the 12 minute video introducing Hopsewee

11:00 am      Tour of Hopsewee Plantation Attic to Cellar guided tour of Original Rice Plantation House, built between 1735 and 1740 and birthplace of Signer of the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Lynch, Jr. This Rice Plantation was successful due to the hundreds of enslaved Africans and their descendants who built over 400 acres of rice fields and cultivated rice for over 125 years.

Our Gullah Historian shares rich history of enslaved Africans and their descendants as you stroll through the beautiful grounds and riverfront.

12:00             Lunch at Hopsewee Plantation – On-site dining with a variety of menu options with seating for up to 80 guests in the Tearoom

                       Time at site 2.5  hours

1:30 p.m.      Leave Hopsewee for shopping in Georgetown and/or at the Hammock Shops in Pawleys Island

4:00 pm.       Travel north on US 17 to Brookgreen Gardens for Night of 1000 Candles – This spectacular light display is located at 1931 Brookgreen Garden Drive, Murrells Inlet – 843-235-6000.  Advanced Tickets required.

See Brookgreen Gardens come to life amid the soft glow of more than 4,500 hand-lit candles and countless sparkling lights.  From 3 – 10 pm walk the paths with a warm cup of cider, hear the sounds of holiday music, carolers singing, and celebrate the season with family and friends!

Suggested Itineraries

African American Gullah-Geechee Heritage in Georgetown County Itinerary

10 a.m.          The Rice Museum – 633 Front Street, Georgetown – 843-546-7423

The rice museum is perhaps the best first stop in Georgetown County to help give visitors a basis of the region’s history and heritage, much of which was influenced by the labor of enslaved West Africans. By 1840, the Georgetown District produced nearly one-half of the total rice crop in the United States. Tours available with fee.

                       Time at site 1.25 hours

11:15 a.m.    Our Gullah Historian will serve as your Step-on Guide and will join your group at the Rice Museum as you travel to Hopsewee Plantation.

                       The significance of the African American population in the City of Georgetown will be emphasized as you view the Joseph Hayne Rainey House — 909 Prince Street, Georgetown.  This National Historic Landmark was the family home of Joseph H. Rainey, the first African American elected to the US House of Representatives (1870-1879). Born in Georgetown County in 1832, it is believed Rainey made blockade-running trips during the Civil War. He was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention of 1868, served two years in the SC Senate, and two years as an internal revenue agent of SC. He died in Georgetown, SC, in 1887. Marker erected by Georgetown Chapter Delta Sigma Theta.

                       You will also view the Bethel AME Church– 417 Broad Street, Georgetown – access to the interior of the church depends on the church schedule.  There is no fee to visit the church, but contributions to the church are recommended.  Founded by freed slaves in 1865 and the oldest black church in the city, Bethel AME was the church home of Fraser Jr. and LaVaughn Robinson, grandparents of former First Lady Michelle Obama.

12:00            Tour of Hopsewee Plantation Attic to Cellar guided tour of Original Rice Plantation House, built between 1735 and 1740 and birthplace of Signer of the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Lynch, Jr.  This Rice Plantation was successful due to the hundreds of enslaved Africans and their descendants who built over 400 acres of rice fields and cultivated rice for over 125 years.

Our Gullah Historian shares rich history of enslaved Africans and their descendants as you stroll through the beautiful grounds and riverfront.

1:00 p.m.      Lunch at Hopsewee Plantation – On-site dining with a variety of menu options with seating for up to 80 guests in the Tearoom

                       Time at site 2.25  hours

3:00 p.m.      The Lowcountry Trail at Brookgreen Gardens – 1931 Brookgreen Garden Drive, Murrells Inlet – 843-235-6000.

                       The Lowcountry Trail consists of a beautiful boardwalk that crosses the hillside overlooking Mainfield, a restored rice field of the former Brookgreen Plantation. For enslaved Africans at Brookgreen, this hill was a bridge between the world of daily work and life in the slave village beyond its crest. Along the trail are interpretive panels that describe life on a rice plantation and four stainless steel figures that represent the Plantation Owner, the Overseer, an Enslaved African Male and an Enslaved African Female. These figures serve as visually compelling landmarks to draw visitors along the trail and to interpret a revealing story about each one’s role in the economic and social system of a Lowcountry plantation.

                       Time at site 1.5 hours

Price Menu

General Admission:

Adults $22, Senior $20  Students 12-17 $15, Children 6-11 $10

Small Groups (12-20 people)

 Adults $21, Students 12-17 $14:00, Children 6-11 $9

Large Groups (more than 20 people)

 Adults $25, Students 12-17 $18.00, Children 6-11 $13.00

Add our Gullah Geechee Presentation to any tour for $5.00 per person for Small Groups. For Groups over 20, Gullah Geechee Presentation Included!

Add our Bottomless Bellini Bar Package to
Any tour for $20 per person

Sweetgrass Basket Sewing Workshop

Sweeetgrass Baskets:  Make your own sweetgrass basket with a local artisan. Spanning back more than 300 years, this Lowcountry tradition was brought by enslaved people from the many different countries of West Africa. Using natural materials, these sturdy baskets were used for winnowing rice and holding household goods. Baskets were made of rush, sweetgrass, pine needles, and palmetto.

Class are limited to 20 people.  A minimum of 4 people are required to make up a class.  The classes last about three hours.

Hopsewee Ghost Tours

Go back in time Wednesday evenings and experience Haunted Tales at Hopsewee Plantation, presenting stories of Author and storyteller Elizabeth Robertson Huntsinger. She’s given hundreds of programs on the history and ghostly legends of Georgetown County, as a Historical Interpreter for over 25 years. She has several books to date as author of Ghosts of Georgetown, More Ghosts of Georgetown, and Georgetown Mysteries and Legends. Come a little earlier for Wine by the River! Enjoy Drinks and Hors d’oeuvres as you browse the gift shop and get your book purchases signed by the authors.

Adults (18-64): $22, Seniors (65+): $20 Youth (12-17): $15 Children (6-11): :$10

Chicora Tours– Charleston Hospewee Experience

Are you a small group from Charleston? This is an all-inclusive package with luxury transportation from Downtown Charleston to Hopsewee and back, in a luxurious 11-passenger van. Experience the Historical Landmark House tour, lunch in the River Oak Cottage Tearoom, a presentation by Hopsewee’s Gullah historian or grounds tour with a Hopsewee historian, then conclude the experience with Wine by the River and free time to explore the original dwellings of the enslaved on the property.

Tour is $145 per person.

We allow our guests to book up to 2 hours before the tour begins.

Transportation is provided.

Lunch is included.

The experience is from 10:00am-4:00pm.

Arrive at 9:45am for check-in at The Charleston Visitors Center at 375 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC for 10:00am departure.

Also Introducing 

Hopsewee Plantation’s Complete Package!

If your group would like to incorporate everything we have to offer, give us a call to book!

This package includes;

Historical Landmark House Tour

Gullah Geechee Presentation

Luncheon Choice 

Wine by the River Happy Hour

$93 per person

Add on Ghost Tour if available on Wednesdays at 5:30 pm for only $20 extra per person!

For more information or to schedule your group contact
Augusta Couch or Raejean Beattie at mail@hopsewee.com
(843) 546-7891
494 Hopsewee Road
Georgetown, SC 29440

A40527